How to stop fabric from freying..help. I'm new.

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DecievedAngel
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How to stop fabric from freying..help. I'm new.

Post by DecievedAngel » Fri Jul 07, 2006 9:05 pm

I'm new to cosplay & sewing. So I was wondering how you stop fabric from freying when you cut it. O.o That seems to be the only trouble I'm having right now anyways.

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Sterling
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Post by Sterling » Sat Jul 08, 2006 2:53 am

Hemming solves all problems.
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TR Rose
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Post by TR Rose » Sat Jul 08, 2006 7:53 am

I use Fray-Check (a small bottle of liquid found with sewing supplies at craft stores) on all my cut edges after I sew the seams. Works great.

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BlackKnightress210
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Post by BlackKnightress210 » Sat Jul 08, 2006 8:21 am

You don't want it to fray after you sew it into whatever it is you're making, is that it? If so then once you're done sewing it shouldn't fray anyhow, but if you want it to stop fraying before you sew it into whatever then just a straight-stitch about a quarter of an inch away from the edge will be fine.

mrs.tomoe
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Post by mrs.tomoe » Sat Jul 08, 2006 6:53 pm

Cutting your fabric with pinking shears (the type of scissors with zig zag blades that look like teeth) instead of straight scissors helps reduce fraying while you're sewing and putting things together. A few fabrics are really bad and will fray like crazy no matter what you do to them, but the great majority of material will behave if you use any of the suggestions that people have given here.

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Post by DecievedAngel » Tue Jul 11, 2006 4:01 pm

:o Thanks everyone.

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*B*
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Post by *B* » Fri Aug 25, 2006 10:19 am

A serger, if you have access to one, is a costumers best friend.
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*B*
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Post by *B* » Fri Aug 25, 2006 10:20 am

Especially if you like to use satin fabrics often(I'm addicted to silky!!!), which frays like the devil.
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gravigurl
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Post by gravigurl » Sun Aug 27, 2006 12:42 pm

Some fabric can be burnt into nonfrayment. I don't totally know which types are better for it I just test it out sometimes I have to wet the fabric down first so that is doesnt catch and burn more than I want. This is just me though I'm an uber pyro
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heathenchild
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fraying

Post by heathenchild » Sun Aug 27, 2006 7:59 pm

i would recommend using monofilament thread for most types of fabric
(it looks like fishing line but a little thinner) also since its clear-no colors to match! plus its durable as all get out.if your stitch gage is small enough than it will stop fraying in its tracks
the only exeptions would be for heavy fabrics(drapery weight and jean) and stretch fabrics ( where it can cause bunching).
hope that helps

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Miss D
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Post by Miss D » Mon Aug 28, 2006 11:51 am

:oops: Monofiliment threads can be itchy though, it generally not meant for clothing constrauction, more for when your top stictching across patterned fabric (like a quilt)


As for fraying fabric, diffrent kinds get diffrent treatment. A serger is great for stitching the edge, and it will keep most fabrics from fraying. Heavy, loosly woven fabrics will just let the serged edge pull out though, so they have to have the edge turned and stitched. Satin and other light wiegth fabrics that fray (organza, ciffon) some times warp when you serge the edge, so you need to adjust your serger when working with them.

I always recomend the Vogue/Butterick Step-by-step guide to sewing tecniques to every one who sews. Its great for beginners who may be just learning some things (like edge finishes, it sugests a bunch of types!) or some one who sews all the time (I sew at least 8 hours a day, but its still nice to look at the book and refresh myself if Iam taking on a task I don't do regularly) This shows the cover: http://books.google.com/books?id=DBN7cn ... ewing+book
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heathenchild
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okay...

Post by heathenchild » Mon Aug 28, 2006 3:09 pm

yeah i hear ya about the itchies :(
when constucting a regular garment i still stick to good ole poly-cotton or silk thread if the fabric doesn't fray.
the only reason i recommend it is it has worked for me in the past
i usually put bias tape over the seams with regular thread if the seam lies around an armhole or neckline(i've only done that once though...too much WORK!)
most of the costumes that i have made for myself have some sort of lining and that is probably why i haven't had that problem :)

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