Majora's Mask

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olfactory_ninja
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Majora's Mask

Post by olfactory_ninja » Sun May 21, 2006 6:56 pm

I'm planning on cosplaying the skull kid, and have no idea how to craft the most important piece: the mask. I'm sure someone here has some expertise with masks. Basically, I'd like to know the best materials to work with, and maybe some techniques for using them, but any help at all would be greatly appreciated.

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Sterling
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Post by Sterling » Sun May 21, 2006 10:23 pm

They sell wooden hearts, or heart like items at craft stores, hollow out the center and add eye holes.
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TR Rose
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Post by TR Rose » Mon May 22, 2006 4:44 am

Do you plan to wear the mask, or just carry it?
If you're carrying it only, using a wooden heart would work.
But if you plan to integrate it with your costume, I'd suggest starting with a blank mask form (either adding to a half-mask or cutting away from a full face mask).

If you're going to wear the mask, you need to make sure you can see clearly through the eyeholes or have someone help you around the convention.

For the spikes, you may wish to use a form of papier mache - I remember in school we did a mask project once that we used a sculptable papier mache for making things to stick out from the mask. It was still lightweight when finished, although you will need to let it dry completely before working on other parts of the mask.

Hope this helps.

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FlareonJupiter
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Post by FlareonJupiter » Mon May 22, 2006 4:51 am

This method is a bit easier -- and lighter on the head. Plus it's fun.

You can easily make a mask with Plaster of Paris (this is a very well-known method to making masks!)

What you need:

Plaster-of-Paris bandage strips
Jar of Vaseline petroleum jelly
Warm (not hot) water
A friend or family member to help you

*You can find Plaster-of-Paris bandage strips in any craft store

Just tie back your hair, and put Vaseline all over your face (this is very important).

Have your friend/family member dip the bandage strips into the water and lay the bandages over your face, making sure not to cover your eyes and nostrils (you need to see and breathe!). Make sure the bandages are evenly blended and smooth. Keep your mouth closed!

Once the mask dries on your face, pull it off carefully. The Vaseline keeps your skin from peeling off.

Attach pieces of heavy paper to the mask to create the heart shape, then cover them with additional bandage strips. You can also cover up the bumps left by the nose and lips, but don't cover the eyeholes and nostrils.

You can then cut cardboard triangle shapes for the spikes on the maskand cover those with Plaster, too.

Now comes the fun part. Once the mask is dry, use a pencil to sketch the details. Use acrylic paints to color the mask. Once the paint's dry, put a small hole into the sides of the mask and tie on some string so the mask can be worn. You're done!

Hope this helps, and good luck :wink:
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olfactory_ninja
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Post by olfactory_ninja » Mon May 22, 2006 10:54 am

Thanks for all the suggestions! I think I'm going to go with the plaster because it's lighter (as I plan on actually wearing the mask, this is something to consider), and seems like it'd be easier to work with. But if there are any other ideas, I'm open.

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mindtailor
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Post by mindtailor » Mon May 22, 2006 12:53 pm

Plaster, especially if you made a whole-face mask and then covered it, would be heavier than papier mache. A lot heavier. If you added enough layers to the papier mache with, say, some construction paper or brown paper bag, it'll stay pretty light and be sturdy. I'm making this costume for my brother, and that's how I'm making the mask - start with a thin wire frame and add paper to that.
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BlackKnightress210
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Post by BlackKnightress210 » Tue May 23, 2006 5:40 am

Also, to get it to stay on. I don't think a string will work that well.

Short story: In my town we have a costume shop. I was in there yesterday buying my wig for The Big. Anyhow, I was looking at the masks because they are so lovely, and I noticed they had headbands. Very ingenius.

So, I'm not sure how you would add this to the mask, but I'd suggest trying something. The headband will hel it stay on, whether you put the band on the top of your head, or towards the back where you're putting your hair up. If you can find some sturdy clear or skin tone or black plastic, it would be most helpful. Put the headband, the plastic, and the mask once finished all together. Perhaps holding up the mask to your face and then adding in the plastic strips and finally the headband so it's exactly what you need. I would go about it this way.

But final words, whether you use my method or not;

A headband would be helpful. (And not the fabric kind.)

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Post by shaowebb » Tue May 30, 2006 9:00 am

BONUS!
Use an engraving tool on a dremel or an ordinary engraver to go over the pattern you draw on your mask. Fill the grooves with scribbles (a kind of rubberised paing for 33 cents) THEN paint it. Your mask now has raised areas and texture. :wink:
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olfactory_ninja
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Post by olfactory_ninja » Wed May 31, 2006 8:04 pm

Thanks for the paint and headband ideas, that'll really help when I finally get to that point. I've decided to try a few different things, making a few masks and see which one works best. I'll be making one with paper mache, one with clay (over a wire frame so it's not too heavy), and maybe one more out of something else. I've seen people use fiberglass (and do a hell of a job with it), but I don't know how well that would work for a mask like this.

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